New ‘Ivanhoe’ Adaptation

Irvine Welsh, Jon S. Baird Reteam To Adapt Walter Scott’s ‘Ivanhoe’


EXCLUSIVE
– Iconoclastic Scottish writer Irvine Welsh (Trainspotting) and director Jon S. Baird(Filth) are re-teaming for a bold new adaptation of the classic Walter Scott adventure tale Ivanhoe.  Jens Meurer is producing through his Berlin-based Egoli Tossell Film banner. Meurer previously worked with Welsh and Baird on Filth, which is how this latest collaboration first sparked.

Basil Iwanyk and his company Thunder Road Pictures are also on-board as producers, along with Stuart Pollok , and Film House Germany’s Christian Angermayer.

Very much the standard bearer for the knight in shining armour genre, Ivanhoe follows the story of a worthy and noble knight who returns to England after the third Crusades. He fights to restore the good King Richard, believed to be held captive in an Austrian prison, and depose Richard’s wicked brother John.

Scott’s iconic romantic novel, first published in 1820, has been adapted numerous times for the big and small screen, memorably in 1952 with a cast that included Elizabeth Taylor, Joan Fontaine, George Sanders and Robert Taylor as Ivanhoe.  The book is also notable for having first introduced audiences to the character of Robin Hood, known here as Locksley, and his band of merry men.

Via Deadline.com

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John Knox and the Monstrous Regiment of Women

John Knox and the Monstrous Regiment of Women | Presbyterian Historical Society

Hmm…So John Knox had some issues.

Before John Knox returned home from exile to become a hero of the Scottish Reformation, he penned a shocking polemic against women in roles of authority: The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women. The diatribe, which he planned to follow with a second and third blast, set the stage for a tumultuous relationship with four ruling queens: Mary of Guise (1515-1560), Mary Tudor (1516-1558), Mary Stuart (1542-1587), and Elizabeth Tudor (1533-1603).

Knox used “monstrous” and “regiment” in an archaic sense to mean “unnatural” and “rule,” arguing that female dominion over men was against God and nature. He lamented that the future of the Protestant faith lay solely in the hands of a female monarchy largely hostile to its precepts. Echoing the era’s widespread assumption that women were inferior to men, capable only of domestic acts such as bearing children, Knox placed blame on the “abominable empire of wicked women” for the trials and tribulations of the Reformation.

John Knox and the Monstrous Regiment of Women | Presbyterian Historical Society.

Knight Errant Writing Update

The hero and heroine are spending the night in a monastery. Time for vespers.

Why I Write to Music—

—and why I studied music, and my kids study music, and why school districts that cut music are run by [expletives deleted].

What did Chris say?

I’m in a writers’ group with author Chris Ward. (Buy his books. He’s a wonderful writer.) On a regular basis, Chris throws out British expressions that I have to look up. So I decided to create a blog feature about it.

So, what did Chris say today?

“Broke my duck” — Originating from cricket, it comes from the phrase “to break your duck’s egg.” It means to do something for the first time. For more info, click here.

“Big girl’s blouse” — a wuss

The other day, he said something about a kip. — It means to get some sleep or take a nap.